CAP424 (N324CP) ready to fly

Our Cessna 172S is here! Please take note of the following:

1). It has an angle of attack indicator, manufacture by safelight. I encourage you to read the operation manual and watch online videos in Youtube of it’s operation in practice. The manual is: http://www.safeflight.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/SCc-AoA-System-Installation-User-Manual-56201-1_revE.pdf
The short version: It doesn’t replace any procedures in the POH or the certificated stall warning system. However, it is a useful awareness tool. It shows you the approach AoA through a line of three green dots. Anything lower is faster (meant for fast cruise). Lower eventually you get yellow and red dots indicating reaching the critical AoA or near it. It also makes a sound when you are near or at the critical AoA that is kind of a clicking sound.
2). The 172 also has a G1000 NXi. You’ll find it has a more refined presentation, it’s faster, and the menus are a little different though the basic components are the same. It has ADS-B as well. You can find the cockpit reference manual: http://static.garmin.com/pumac/190-02178-00_B.pdf and a pilot’s guide: http://static.garmin.com/pumac/190-02177-00_A.pdf
There are also online material to outline the differences between the G1000 version we are used to.
3). The C172 doesn’t have an “off” position in its fuel selector. Instead it has a fuel cutoff knob right above the fuel selector. Also, if you are used to constant-speed propellers, the 172 has a fixed-pitch prop. This means the the RPM depends on throttle and airspeed. So when you set the throttle to 2600 RPM in cruise and descend without reducing the throttle, you can overspeed the prop (the limitation is at 2700 RPM).